Employment Verification | A No Brainer for Hiring Employers

When you’re looking into a potential new hires’ eyes, and they tell you why they’re a great fit for the job, they might not be lying. They very well could be a great person to fill the position. You look down at the resume and back at them. It seems almost too good to be true. They have experience working in your industry, they’ve worked in a higher position than they are seeking, and they have more years in the industry than candidate B.

Candidate B seems a little nervous. You can tell this is important to them, and they’ve told you they know their experience in the industry might not be the highest, but they’ve worked so hard to get this opportunity. All you can think about is the confidence in the eyes of candidate A, who you KNOW has what it takes to perform at a high level, because they’ve “been there before.”

Who do you go with? Do you verify the dates and positions listed in the resume of candidate A? You could see they were confident, and have time invested. What could happen if you don’t?

Did You Know?

86% of people surveyed by HireRight in 2015 indicated that verifying employment revealed candidates who lied on their resume. This means something, anything related to their work history, was a lie. Still trust candidate A? There may be gaps in employment for reasons out of the candidate’s control, but there might also be intent to show off they are more than qualified, when in reality they aren’t.

Reasons Someone Might Lie About Employment History

  • Small Business Venture
  • Maternity Leave
  • Return to School
  • Incarceration
  • Extend Job Start/End Date
  • Boost Job Title for Higher Salary

As a qualified and experience background check company, Employment Screening Services provides employment verification included in our background check packages. You should always make sure your potential hire is being truthful in their resume, as well as throughout the interview process. Trust is all you have at the beginning of a working relationship, and if you hire the wrong person, you face threats of having to retrain after a failed hire, workplace accidents, financial mistakes, and much more. To talk to someone from ESS about employment verification checks, just give us a call and we’ll be happy to help.

College Football Player Dies During Workout, Strength Coach Not Certified

Employment Screening Services is a company that prides ourselves on ensuring your organization hires the right man or woman for the job. The way we go about this is by verifying and checking the background of your potential new hire, and ensuring that they are completely honest and compliant with your organization’s regulations. Education and employment verification is something we specialize in. The following story is a very tragic one.

This past June, a teenager attended his football workout. The temperature was 81 degrees. A hot day, but nothing out of the ordinary. Running the workouts that day would be Ross Bowsher, the head football sports performance coach. Tyler Heintz, 19, was enrolled in early summer classes and preparing to fulfill his long term goal of playing division 1 football at Kent State. As an incoming freshman, he had yet to even strap on the pads, as this was a summer preseason workout, to show dedication and commitment.

That morning, Tyler Heintz would collapse around 9am. He was pronounced dead shortly after.

A tragic story of a young man destined to fulfill his dreams. The cause of death was initially undetermined, but has now been determined was due to hyperthermia (inability of the body to properly cool itself). This was one of 35 college football players that have died since 2000. 29 of those deaths were related to outside preseason conditioning or offseason drills.

One of the things the NCAA has done to combat this problem is requiring all strength coaches to be certified by a sanctioning body. This was a change made in 2015, after Bowsher had been employed at Purdue and Arkansas Tech. He clearly had no intention of harming any of the players, as he was employed to strengthen and condition his players. He was entering his 2nd year as the strength coach at Kent State. 

Following Heintz’s death, both certification bodies, the National Strength Coaches Association and Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association reached out to CBS Sports to tell them that Bowsher was not certified by either association.

A teenager died during a workout with an uncertified strength coach.

So what does this have to do with background screening? Well, what we do is prevent organizations from hiring someone who is unqualified. Depending on the industry, which all have different regulations, we check and maintain that everything on their work history is verified, and ensure that any obligatory accreditations are met. This helps prevent lawsuits. Lawsuits like the one that will probably be instituted on the case of Tyler Heintz. Though the coach had been certified in “Personal Training” from IUPUI, which is a program designed to prepare students for accreditation tests, he was never formally certified.

This not only causes a bad look for the University and it’s administration, but is going to lead to a hefty lawsuit. The Conditioning Coaches Association Executive Director has this to say about the matter.

“Today, the way liability is, if you’re not certified by an accredited organization you’re walking on thin ice.” Lawsuits could be $20 million-$30 million dollars. I can’t imagine hiring someone without the appropriate credentials.”

A tragic story of a young man losing his life. An unfortunate example of how improper hiring practices and failing to ensure all regulations are verified can end up costing massive amounts of money to an organization.